Tuesday, 24 October 2017

Czech Pirates promise to facilitate communication with offices

ČTK |
23 June 2017

Prague, June 22 (CTK) - The Czech Pirate Party, which is one of the strongest extra-parliamentary parties, promises in its election manifesto to facilitate and speed up citizens' communication with authorities, its chairman Ivan Bartos said today.

The Pirates would like to enable people to secure their personal documents and register a car or a dog on the Internet and establish a business company within one day only, for a low fee.

The first ten applicants can use this on a pirate website, Bartos added.

"In our programme, we count with the possibility to establish a firm online for a 500-crown fee and that this fee can be paid by card," Bartos said.

At present, the minimum costs of a firm establishment, including the court and notary fees, is 10,113 crowns, Bartos said.

Pirates promise to arrange this within five days under current conditions, while this would take a common applicant up to three weeks.

The Pirates also promise to push through that data and not people would be "circulating" at offices.

New personal documents, including IDs and passports, should be secured electronically.

"A change of permanent residence, for instance, is not to last more than ten minutes," Bartos said.

People should be able to fill in their tax returns on the Internet and the document should have one page only, Bartos added.

The Pirates decided to run in the October 20-21 general election independently.

The Pirate Party has one senator and some representatives in regional and local authorities.

It has failed in the elections to the Chamber of Deputies so far. However, according to the latest polls, this is one of the parties that have a chance to cross the 5-percent parliamentary threshold.

($1=23.565 crowns)

hol/dr/rtj

Copyright 2015 by the Czech News Agency (ČTK). All rights reserved.
Copying, dissemination or other publication of this article or parts thereof without the prior written consent of ČTK is expressly forbidden. The Prague Daily Monitor is not responsible for its content.